Texas insurance marketplaces struggling to survive amid insurer exits

Insurance premiums for people with disabilities are rising and the state’s health care system is in dire straits, leaving many people uninsured.

The Texas Department of Insurance says that the total number of insurers offering health insurance coverage in the state is just under 8,000.

But that’s far short of the tens of thousands needed to sustain the state as it transitions to a single-payer health care program, a plan to replace the current Medicaid program.

The agency says that at least 3,000 people have enrolled in Medicaid coverage since October, though it declined to provide a number.

The total number in the program is now about 12,000, but only about half of the 8,600 people who signed up in the last year have been fully covered.

And that leaves a long way to go in filling the gap.

The problems are so bad that in the past month, at least two insurers have pulled out of the Texas insurance exchange, leaving the state with only one insurer offering coverage.

And as Texas struggles with the health care crisis, the state faces another challenge: a shortage of people who want to get insured through the marketplace.

As the deadline for getting insurance has passed, insurers are now running out of money.

That means people are paying more out of pocket for their premiums and deductibles, and that puts more pressure on the health insurance industry.

Insurers say the problems are compounded by the fact that the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, requires all people to have health insurance.

So if you have a pre-existing condition, that can have a huge impact on your premiums.

That’s why health care experts are calling for a single payer system, which would include a single insurance company, a government agency or a government-run agency that could offer subsidized health insurance to all Americans.

The solution, experts say, is to require that everyone in the country have insurance, and if everyone does, the government would provide subsidies to help people buy coverage.

This story was produced by National Geographic’s Science Team.